Updates @ Radiation Alert

Analog Radiation Detector Comparison

A number of radiation industry professionals still prefer analog radiation detectors even today.  Here at SEI, we ditched the lunch box design common in a number of analog meters for something a little smaller. The following radiation detector comparison will help you nail down the right analog Geiger counter for your needs. Our Monitor 4 is a “hot dog tube” based Geiger Counter. Of the three versions listed, this model had been in production the longest. What started as a small brown square case that established it as an industry standard, has now become a much more ergonomic design with all the same features customers have come to love. Some customers need the Monitor 4EC, which is the energy compensated alternative with the same operating range.  If you’re in need of a  higher operating range, such as 1000 mR/hr, then the energy compensated MC1K is reporting for duty. Both EC Continue...

Radiological Quantities And Units: A “Real World” Perspective

Introduction The subject of quantities and units used in radiation protection is an important, complex, controversial, and sometimes even an emotional one. While the United Stales maintains, for the most part, use of the historical (special) units, the rest of the world has converted to SI units. While the author has his own opinion of which system is better. or at least easier to use, both are presented and discussed here with an emphasis on real world use of quantities and units rather than the theory behind them. Radioactivity Radioactivity is a quantity used primarily to measure an amount of  radioactive material. It is expressed in terms of the rate of decay of a radioactive material. The special unit of radioactivity is the curie (1 Ci ≡ 2.22 X 1012 dpm) and the SI unit is the becquerel (1 Bq ≡ 1 dps). Since both of these units are defined in Continue...

Calculating Exposure Rates from Known Quantities of Gamma-Emitting Radioisotopes

ABSTRACT This article explains the use of the “6CE” equation for estimating exposure rates from point sources of known quantities of various specific gamma ­emitting radioisotopes. A table is provided listing principle particle and photon emissions from many commonly used radioisotopes. THE “6CE” EQUATION It Is sometimes necessary to estimate the exposure rate which can be expected from a known quantity of a single gamma-emitting isotope. Such a situation might occur when ordering a significant quantity of radioactive material prior to an experiment, when purchasing a new calibration source, or in radiography work. An equation which addresses this need very nicely is R = 6CE (f) / r2 Where: R • exposure rate at distance r (in Roentgens/hour) 6 = a unit conversion constant C = activity (in Curies) E = total photon energy (in MeV) f = decimal fraction of photon yield r = distance from the point source Continue...

Radiation Alert® Ranger – Quick Start Guide

This video will get you started with the use of your Radiation Alert® Ranger. Watch this quick start video guide to run through the menu and the general settings and features of your radiation detector. With the exception of the built in efficiencies, this video is also applicable to the Monitor 200 and Monitor 1000EC models as well, as they all have the same basic, simple to use interface. Continue...